How choosing the wrong trainer can affect your learning.

All companies, except startups and small traditional businesses, rely on training services to improve their employees’ productivity, workplace culture, environment and increase their profitability. Whether the training is done in-house or by an external consultant or trainer, business owner and CEOs see training as an integral part of a successful business. Employees also respect workplaces that provide them with the opportunities to learn and grow their portfolio - this is especially true for working millennials.

How choosing the wrong trainer can affect your learning.

 

All companies, except startups and small traditional businesses, rely on training services to improve their employees’ productivity, workplace culture, environment and increase their profitability. Whether the training is done in-house or by an external consultant or trainer, business owner and CEOs see training as an integral part of a successful business. Employees also respect workplaces that provide them with the opportunities to learn and grow their portfolio - this is especially true for working millennials.

 

However, selecting and vetting trainers when engaging a training company is a challenging process. Well-known and reputable trainers are rarely available, and even if they are, they are too expensive for most smaller companies. Many companies are still using the methods from the stone age to source for trainers, through referrals (networking with other Human Resource managers and doing cross evaluation of trainers) and doing progressive programs (so as to diversify the cost of paying for a lousy program upfront). Most companies settle for trainers who are less renown even if they have to risk wasting precious resources on an unsatisfying training experience the trainees.

 

A bad training experience, as a result of choosing a wrong trainer, has negative impacts on the learning of your employees, especially since most of them start off with having high expectations of the training outcomes.

 

Here are how choosing wrong trainers to execute your company training would be costly to your learning:

1.      Failure to bring out the best in your employees.

A good trainer is one that gives you right tools that will helpful you bring your career to the next level, and motivates you to use them in all areas of your life. A good training experience can be a company-wide turning-point – be it building closer relations between colleagues and superiors, helping individuals become more conscientious in their service, or motivating employees improve themselves constantly.

However, not all training experience can promise such a change. Even with the best trainer, the training program may not be a good fit, and even with the most fitting program, your trainer may not bring out the most out of your employees.

Companies often end up wasting precious production time and resources by engaging the wrong trainer, resulting in trainees becoming cynical about such training.

 

2.      Outdated content

Industry-specific trainings are necessary to keep all members of the company up-to-date with the market. Trainers teaching general courses often fail to tackle problems faced by niche industries, and they often use only prominent and outdated issues. This is especially true for knowledge intensive industries like Fintech, consumer tech, and e-commerce.  

 

3.    Cynicism

When employees begin to think of corporate training as a “waste of time,” “load of nonsense,” or even “down-time.” Then they shut off from learning and reduce their absorption rate for new skills and knowledge, such that even the best training sessions goes down the drain and further perpetuating the cycle of bad training experiences.

In the long run, this toxic environment will hinder human resource efforts to promote workplace learning as nobody want to champion activities that are unpopular and seen as a waste of time.

 

 

Our Advice:

1.      Get a running start.

HR staff can gather questions and topics from the various departments before selecting trainers and training programs. Then pose these questions upfront so that trainers understand the deliverables expected by the trainees. This means having at least a round of meeting with the actual trainers of the day so ensure that the agenda is clear on both ends. This also gives the trainers on the expected responses and what to prepare for the actual training itself and to tweak their programs (if necessary) to suit the clients.

 

2.      Find out more about your trainers

Request for full details of the trainers from their attached companies and do some investigation on their past performance. You can request for work evaluation from ex-employers as they usually provide a less bias representation since they have nothing at stake. You could also check with their ex-clients as a form of references so that you could expect the experience that they bring about too.

 

3.      Request for a trial exposure to the program with a smaller group.

Making a purchase decision for a large group at once is too risky. Try organising a trial program, first with the organising committee members, then, for a selected cross-functional group (for diversity).

 

4.    Use online marketplaces like LearningRank.com

You get to see what other users have reviewed about their trainers and provide your feedback to trainers as well. Find a diverse range of training services so as to give your company a holistic training experience. You will be able to find the best trainers for your learning at the price that you can afford.